Weekly Photo Challenge: Curves

St. Sebald Church, Nuremberg, Germany

St. Sebald Church, Nuremberg, Germany

St. Sebald’s Church is Nuremberg’s oldest parish, dating back possibly to the early 12th century. The church, built in the Gothic style, also reflects architectural styles of other periods.

St. Sebald was badly bombed in World War II. In the nave, there are pictures of the ruins with short, thought-provoking statements on the destruction of war, a pertinent message for every visitor to heed. Many of the paintings, sculptures and altar pieces were removed to a save place prior to the bombing of Nuremberg.

Nave of St. Sebald Church

Nave of St. Sebald Church

In one story, Sebald was a Nuremberg hermit and part of the 10th and 11th centuries reform movement, wanting to free the church from its close connection to the nobility class.

Sebald in German, and Sebaldus in Latin comes from 2 words, “se” meaning sea, and “bald” meaning brave. He may have been known as a patron saint of sailors. However, in Nuremberg, he became patron saint of business owners and traders as the city became more economically prosperous after it gained the status of a free, imperial city by the Roman Emperor in the 13th century.

Check out the other entries here.

Weekly Photo Challenge: Escape

Bingen Convent, Germany

Bingen Convent, Germany

This photo was taken a few years ago when we visited Germany. In the foreground are the vineyards, which flourish along the Rhine. In the background is the Bingen convent, widely known because of Hildegard. Among other things, she was a composer, herbalist, and advisor to Europe’s aristocrats, including the pope. You can visit the other entries of the Weekly Photo Challenge here.