The Church and the federal election

The Church and the federal election

One of the quintessential questions for some Christians over the centuries has been: What is the relationship between the church and the state; faith and politics? The question remains, for some, as contemporary and relevant as it is ancient and historical. The wide variety of Christian denominations have different “takes” in answering such questions. One thing is clear, there is no avoiding politics—those who claim neutrality are also making a political statement, there is no room for quietism and indifference (I still have not, received any comments or correspondence from the Church of Sweden on my last post and wonder what their lack of response means concerning the issue that I raised). Although I believe it wrongheaded for the Church to endorse any political party—indeed such endorsement can lead to tyranny and oppression, as the dark pages of church history have hopefully taught us—nonetheless, as citizens in the world, it is our right and responsibility, our duty and privilege to be involved in politics as stewards of creation and servants of justice and peace in the world. In our democratic society, we do this by showing up at the polling stations and voting.

So, dear readers, are you intending to vote in the upcoming federal election? If so, what are do you think are the most pressing issues in this election? What do you think of the 2011 ELCIC Compassionate Justice Election Resource? Click here.

What do you think of the KAIROS federal election kit focussing on the three topics of climate change, indigenous rights, and migrant justice? Click here

Do you think these resources are helpful for church folk in educating them on the most pressing election issues? Did reading these resources help you or change your views on certain issues? Are you going to vote in the 2011 federal election? If not, can you explain why you are not voting? I’d love to hear from you.

Mikhail Lennikov seeks sanctuary in First Lutheran Church

Mikhail Lennikov seeks sanctuary in First Lutheran Church

 Mikhail Lennikov, a former Russian KGB agent, seeks sanctuary in First Lutheran Church, Vancouver, B.C. The practice of sanctuary goes back at least to biblical times. Such a practice is certainly in line with the spirit of Jesus who loved and welcomed into his midst the outcasts of his day. Should sanctuary, under certain circumstances, take precedent over civil law? What are such circumstances? What do you think? Read and watch video here.