Brief thoughts on Hosea 2:23-Names

Brief thoughts on Hosea 2:23-Names

ירחמו Pitied

האנשים שלי My people
In my devotions this morning, one of the texts I read was Hosea 
2:14-23. The last verse, 23, in particular lept out at me. It 
reminded me of the importance of names. Indeed, the prophet 
Hosea, who was active in the eight century BCE, employs the 
names of people to symbolize the relationship between God and 
Israel. The name Hosea in Hebrew means salvation. This prophet 
then was a proclaimer of God’s message of salvation for God’s 
people.
   Like most of the Israelite prophets, God called them to 
proclaim messages of warning and judgement as well as promise 
and hope. The prophets most likely did not win any popularity 
contests! 
   During the time that Hosea was active as a prophet, the 
Israelites were highly attracted to the Canaanite gods and the 
worship rituals associated with them—which were, of course in 
violation of the First Commandment, and other Commandments 
as well. 
   Another temptation amongst the leaders of the Israelites was 
to form alliances with the Assyrians and Egyptians, for military 
protection and security. However, God was not pleased with such 
political and military alliances. Rather, God sees such alliances as 
a lack of faith/trust in him. 
   Hosea in chapter two, verse twenty-three speaks a prophetic 
word of promise and hope for the Israelites in the future. The 
name of Hosea’s child Lo-ruhamah, which means “not pitied,” will 
be changed to “I will have pity.” In other words, Israel’s suffering 
and judgement due to their unfaithfulness to God and God’s 
covenant will be reversed. God’s grace and mercy shall prevail in 
a renewed covenant relationship with God and God’s people. The 
name change of this child is a living symbol then of God’s grace, 
mercy and lovingkindness. 
   The same is true in the case of the child named Lo-ammi, 
which means “Not my people.” Lo-ammi shall be given the name 
“You are my people” as a living symbol of God’s renewed 
covenant relationship with the Israelites. 
   Names are extremely important. What is your name? What 
does it mean for you as you live your life? What might your name 
mean in relationship with God and with other people? Does your 
name reveal the grace, mercy and lovingkindness that God 
desires for everyone? Hopefully it will be a sign, a symbol of 
God’s presence and blessing in your life as well as in the lives 
of others. 

 

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The New Year and brief thoughts on Joshua 24:1-15

Open Bible-public domain

During my first devotion-time in this New Year, I read Joshua 24:1-15. The pericope is a familiar one to many. Joshua gathered the tribes of Israel for a solemn, covenant renewal ceremony. He highlighted God’s saving activity among the Israelites, beginning with Abraham and his descendants, through to the giving of the Promised Land. According to Joshua, it is in the act of remembering God’s saving activity in the past that Israel is graced with the opportunity to respond to God by putting away other gods and renewing the covenant with God by serving him.

The pericope is a significant one for this first day of the new year. This day affords us the opportunity to remember God’s saving activity in our lives over the course of this past year. In remembering what God has done for us, we are free to respond with a renewed commitment to serve God in 2019.

A renewed commitment to serve God each day in the ordinary activities of our lives might involve something as simple as the following example: Instead of complaining to God about the inclement, cold, snowy weather; give God thanks that you are blessed with health to shovel the snow off the sidewalk—thus giving you the opportunity to exercise after a large dinner on New Year’s eve.

Brief thoughts and quotes on humility and faith

Today, as I came across the two quotes below, it got me thinking a bit about the importance of humility and faith.

I wonder, if we could turn back the pages of history when religions legitimized violence, hatred and war; if instead those who were such certain advocates of these had been more humble in their faith in God and practice of their faith whether much of the darkness of religious history would have been avoided and humankind may have moved a bit closer to perfect shalom; a more concrete manifestation of the realm of God; of God’s will being done on earth as in heaven.

I wonder too, if, as we look at all of the troubled spots in the world today; whether a greater mixture of humility and faith would turn around the violence and evil that seems so prevalent in far too many places; carried out with the pretext of knowing God and knowing and doing God’s will in the name of God and of what is believed to be the only true faith. I wonder…

“Those who believe they believe in God without anguish of mind, without uncertainty, without doubt, and even at times without despair, believe only in the idea of God, not in God Himself.” –Madeleine L’Engle

“Men [and women] never do evil so completely or cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction.” – Blaise Pascal