CLWR’s first webinar

Recently I attended Canadian Lutheran World Relief’s first ever webinar on Refugees, COVID-19 and the Church. It was quite informative. According to one of the speakers, there are around 80 million refugees in the world today. That is tragic, since many are in refugee camps where they are spaced close together, hence it is difficult to maintain the 2 metre distance. Moreover, water to wash hands, masks and sanitizer are in short supply, if available at all—so they are at a much higher risk of contracting the coronavirus. Click on the following link to hopefully view the webinar: CLWR.

Book Review: Where Is God In My Praying? Biblical Responses to Eight Searching Questions

Where Is God In My Praying? Biblical Responses to Eight Searching Questions

Author: Daniel Simundson

Publisher: Augsburg Publishing House

93 pages

Reviewed by Rev. Garth Wehrfritz-Hanson

Dr. Daniel J. Simundson, at the time this volume was published was professor of Old Testament at Luther Northwestern Theological Seminary. Dr. Simundson had previously authored Where Is God In My Suffering? Biblical Responses to Seven Searching Questions, also published by Augsburg.

The eight questions Dr. Simundson addresses are: 1. Why Should I Pray? 2. Why Is It So Hard to Pray? 3. Must We All Pray the Same Way? 4. Can I Tell God What I Really Think? 5. Dare I Ask for That? 6. What Good Does It Do to Pray for Others? 7. Does God Always Answer Prayer? 8. Does God Need Our Thanks and Praise? Professor Simundson looks at each of these questions in light of both Hebrew Bible and New Testament texts.

In addition to these questions, Dr. Simundson also addresses other questions like: How do I know God is listening? Do our prayers actually affect what God will do? Will God be angry with me for saying that?

God created us to be in relationship with him. Through prayer, we can communicate our thoughts and feelings with God. God has commanded us to pray. When we find it hard to pray, we can read the Psalter and find examples of prayer for the entire range of human circumstances.

Sin and broken relationships; our contemporary secular world; worry over speaking the ‘right’ words; feeling our prayers go unanswered or answered with a “no;” all contribute to why we find it so hard to pray. When we are unable to pray, “the Spirit himself intercedes for us with groans that words cannot express” (Romans 8:26).

There are, of course, many different kinds of prayers for the wide array of life’s circumstances. We can be utterly honest with God in our prayers. Biblical examples of this are Job, Jeremiah, and Jesus—among others. Prayers of lament, as in the Psalter, are often the best, most honest prayers.

Professor Simundson has a helpful discussion of both the downside and upside of intercessory prayer. He cautions against manipulating God and people by intercessory prayer. One example he cites is that someone may tell you: “I am praying that God will give you a wonderful spiritual experience so that you can see the light and leave that wishy-washy church and join up with some true believers” (pp. 67-68). He also cites biblical examples of intercessory prayers: Abraham’s prayer for Sodom and Jesus’ prayer for his enemies. In both cases God does what God wants—he ends up destroying Sodom and we do not know how or if Jesus’ prayer had any positive affects on his enemies.

Regarding unanswered prayer, Dr. Simundson states that it is not likely that God is angry with the person praying; nor does he or she necessarily lack enough faith. Unanswered prayer does not necessarily mean that God is uncaring either.

In the Bible, God said no to Moses, Paul and Jesus. Moses was not allowed to enter the Promised Land. Paul did not have the thorn in his flesh removed. God did not remove the cup of suffering from Jesus.

According to Dr. Simundson, God doesn’t need out praise and thanks—however, God may like or enjoy our praise and thanks, as in the case of the father in the parable of the prodigal son’s return home. Our praise and thanks may also improve our quality of life by giving us joy and gratitude like the leper who was healed by Jesus. We can praise and thank God for the blessings of creation and for God’s saving work throughout history.

However, in times of great suffering, war, natural disasters, COVID-19, and so on; it may be more appropriate to cry out to God with prayers of lament. Even then, it is possible to praise and thank God; for ultimately his will and purposes shall prevail.

This little volume is beneficial to both pastors and laity (especially those who struggle with prayer) and is very easy to read—highly recommended!