Book Review: Finally Comes The Poet

Finally Comes The Poet: Daring Speech For Proclamation

Author: Walter Brueggemann

Publisher: Fortress Press

165 pages, including: Preface, Introduction, Notes, and Scripture Index Paperback

At the time of writing this volume, Walter Brueggemann was Professor of Old Testament at Columbia Theological Seminary, in Atlanta, Georgia, and President-elect of the Society of Biblical Literature. Since then, he went on to become one of the most renowned, respected and prolific Hebrew Bible scholars.

This book was Dr. Brueggemann’s the Lyman Beecher Lectures on preaching at Yale Divinity School. The book’s title was inspired by Walt Whitman’s poem, Leaves of Grass: “Finally shall come the poet worthy of that name, the true Son of God shall come singing his songs.”

In addition to the Introduction, the work consists of four chapters: 1. Numbness and Ache The Strangeness of Healing; 2. Alienation and Rage The Old Invitation to Doxological Communion; 3. Restlessness and Greed Obedience and Missional Imagination; 4. Resistance and Relinquishment A Permit for Freedom.

Professor Brueggemann’s writing is, at times, profound and provocative, passionate and poetic. To wet potential readers’ appetites, here are a few quotations:

The act of preaching is not instruction, rational discourse, or moral suasion. It is the invitation and permit to practice a life a doxology and obedience, which properly orders the ongoing relationship of sovereign and subject, which in seasons of trust is that of parent-child, or even friend and friend (John 15:14-15).” p. 68

Praise is always an act of political reality, daring a new way in the world.” p. 69

Judged by any pragmatic norm, praise is foolishness. It has no end beyond itself. Praise is the simple act of enacting our true purpose, namely letting God be God in our life. As that happens, we take on our true human character. In the act of praise, we become the creatures whom we are meant to be; against subjectivity that produces anxiety, against technique that leaves us empty, we are now filled with life as creatures gifted by the Creator.” pp. 73-74

The great fact of the Western world, and therefore the circumstance of our preaching, is that we gather as restless, greedy children of disproportion, caught in an ideology of acquisitiveness. That is, social goods, social access, and social power are not equally distributed.” p. 82

The theological issue in the Sabbath command is rest. The preacher’s theme for those who gather is restlessness. Restlessness touches every aspect of our lives: economic, political, sexual, psychological, and theological.” p. 98

The Jubilee precludes any exploitative economic practice that is ultimately demeaning of human persons and destructive of human community.” p. 102

The event of preaching is an event in transformed imagination. Poets, in the moment of preaching, are permitted to perceive and voice the world differently, to dare a new phrase, a new picture, a fresh juxtaposition of matters long known.” p. 109

It is in the reality of being loved and reloved, treasured, trusted, summoned, and gifted, that we become free enough to be the children of God—freed for life with God.” p. 113

We have only the word, but the word will do. It will do because it is true that the poem shakes the empire, that the poem heals and transforms and rescues, that the poem enters like a thief in the night and gives new life, fresh from the word and from nowhere else.” p. 142

This volume is most likely to appeal to biblical scholars, theologians and preachers.

About dimlamp
I am, among other things, a sojourner, a sinner-saint, a baptized, life-long learner and follower of Jesus, and Lutheran pastor. Dim Lamp: dimlamp.wordpress.com gwh photos: gwhphotos.wordpress.com

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