The Diary of a Country Priest

The Diary of a Country Priest

This summer I recently read The Diary of a Country Priest by the political writer, Georges Bernanos. As the title suggests, it is written in diary form and is set in a poor rural parish in France during the early twentieth century. The priest, an orphan, is young and sometimes naïvely idealistic, while at other times most insightful. As the Christ-figure in the novel, he has his share of suffering and matures in his faith because of it.

For those who may be interested in the novel, here are three rather profound quotes:

Rich and poor alike, you’d do better to look at yourselves in the mirror of want, for poverty is the image of your own fundamental illusion. Poverty is the emptiness in your hearts and in your hands. (p. 62)

It is very easy to surrender to God’s will when it is proved to you day after day that you can do no good. But in the end one would thankfully accept, as divine favours, set-backs and humiliations which are simply the inevitable results of our folly. (p. 190)

Even from the Cross, when Our Lord in His agony found the perfection of His saintly Humanity—even then He did not own Himself a victim of injustice. They know not what they do. Words that have meaning for the youngest child, words some would like to call childish, but the spirits of evil must have been muttering them ever since without understanding, and with ever-growing terror. (p. 292)

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About dimlamp
I am, among other things, a sojourner, a sinner-saint, a baptized, life-long learner and follower of Jesus, and Lutheran pastor. Dim Lamp: dimlamp.wordpress.com gwh photos: gwhphotos.wordpress.com

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