Sermon 3 Pentecost Yr A

3 Pentecost Yr A, 1/06/2008

Matt 7:21-29

Rev. Garth Wehrfritz-Hanson

Pastor of Grace Lutheran Church, &

Chaplain of The Good Samaritan Society’s

South Ridge Village, Medicine Hat, Alberta

 

“House Building”

 

Today’s gospel marks the end of Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount. It is quite instructive for us that at the conclusion of this Sermon, Jesus gives us teachings that are very practical concerning not just speaking the right words but doing the right actions. He also warns all would-be disciples not to be deceived by those who speak well and call attention to their abilities to prophesy, cast out demons and do deeds of power in Christ’s name. There is a word of sober judgement here on such people. There is also a word of warning to listen carefully to Jesus’ words and then act on them. Those who do listen and act in faith are like a wise carpenter who builds on a solid foundation of rock, unlike a foolish carpenter who builds on sand.

The famous Danish theologian Soren Kierkegaard once wrote a vivid parable concerning the danger of becoming just a satisfied customer with religion, an occupation so absorbing that it left no inclination to do anything about it.

He imagined that near the cross of Christ had stood a man who beheld the terrible scene, and then became a professor of what he saw. He explained it all.

Later he witnessed the persecution and imprisonment and cruel beating of the apostles and became professor of what he had witnessed.

He studied the drama of the cross, but he was never crucified with Christ in his own life.

He studied apostolic history, but he did not live apostolically.

He was an observer and a talker about Christianity, but not a doer.1

There is an old adage, “When all is said and done, there is a lot more said, than done!” Is this not true of many people in our world today? There are so many “experts” who know a tremendous amount of information about their subject that they have specialized in, but does their information really get translated into actions, to practical doing? In many cases, I think the information gets lost in the “lack of translation” from the theoretical, the academic, to the practical, active, everyday real life of the world.

This is also related to what Jesus has to say about those who say to Jesus: ‘Lord, Lord, did we not prophesy in your name, and cast out demons in your name, and do many deeds of power in your name?’ Or in modern day language: “Every day a sucker is born. Beware of charlatans who may speak with words of sweetness and light, yet are working overtime to deceive you.”

There are so many charlatans out there—everything from telemarketers on the phone to televangelists on the T.V., to false contractors who prey on seniors promising to do home improvements, to name only a few. Isn’t it interesting that, according to a recent article in The Medicine Hat News Canada is finally cracking down on telemarketers. By this fall, September I believe, Canadian citizens will be able to register and have less pesky telemarketers calling us. I for one am certainly looking forward to that!

In the realm of faith—there surely are no shortage of televangelists out there on T.V. promising things that are rather controversial and questionable. For example, I happened to watch a short advertising blurb by one televangelist lately who promised special blessings on those who would send him money to purchase a handkerchief, which, he claimed, had the power to give blessings. This fake televangelism so insults true Christianity and Jesus himself in that the false televangelists believe they can reduce Jesus to the ability to sell him like any other consumer product for their own personal gain no matter how manipulative and deceitful are their methods as long as it works for them. NO! Jesus soberly warns us today, such folks shall face a hard judgement: “Then I will declare to them, ‘I never knew you; go away from me, you evildoers.’”

In stark contrast to this false, charlatan type of faith, Jesus tells the parable of building one’s faith on a solid rock foundation. What kind of house of faith are you building? Are we building on solid rock, Christ our Lord and Saviour, or are we building on sinking sand?

Albert P. Stauderman tells the following story: For many years a man had worked faithfully as foreman of the building crew for a wealthy contractor. The contractor decided to take a long vacation on a world cruise, but before leaving he gave his foreman a set of plans for a dream house. “Build it according to specifications and spare no expense,” he instructed. “I want this to be a good house for a special reason.”

After the contractor had gone, the foreman thought about the many years he had worked for small wages, and he decided that this was the time to make a profit for himself. He cut down on the specifications for the house and substituted cheap material wherever it would not show, pocketing the difference. Then the contractor returned and examined the house. Then he told the foreman, “You have served me well for many years. In reward I have planned this house for you. It is yours, to own and live in.”

Who got cheated?2

Upon what do we build our house, our faith and life? Is it Christ the solid rock or is it sinking sand? There are many things that people invest in—pouring out their time, energy, money and other talents and resources. However, are they lasting or fleeting? Do they satisfy the deepest needs of life? Do they enhance and strengthen life and faith? Do they contribute to the overall health and well being of individuals and society as a whole? Oftentimes those things that are fleeting and fail to strengthen life and faith may very well appeal to folks at first sight; people may benefit from them in an immediate way; however, when people begin to face the storms, earthquakes and floods of life—when the going gets tough such things shall not last nor give strength to life and faith. It is by listening to Christ’s words and then acting on them in faith that give us strength in life and deepen our faith. If we do this, then we shall surely be able to endure any storms, earthquakes, floods and tornadoes that life dishes out.

Scottish entertainer Sir Harry Lauder always left his audiences laughing. But as he came out of a theatre one night, he was handed a telegram informing him that his son had been killed in action. Lauder cancelled his engagements, but three weeks later he was on his way to France to entertain the troops. “When a man has a great sorrow,” Lauder said, “he can turn sour on life, or turn to drink, or turn to God and find joy and hope in doing his will.”3

People of faith who trust in Christ the rock, our solid foundation to build their house, are folks like Sir Harry Lauder—they obey Christ, they listen and then act, and they “find joy and hope in doing his will.” May God grant all of us sufficient grace so to do. Amen.

1 Cited from: Sermon Illustrations For The Gospel Lessons (St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1980, 1981, 1982), pp. 20-21.

2 Albert P. Stauderman, Let Me Illustrate: Stories and Quotations for Christian Communicators (Minneapolis: Augsburg Publishing House, 1983), p. 107.

3 Ibid. p. 67.

 

 

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About dimlamp
I am, among other things, a sojourner, a sinner-saint, a baptized, life-long learner and follower of Jesus, and Lutheran pastor. Dim Lamp: dimlamp.wordpress.com gwh photos: gwhphotos.wordpress.com

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